WASHINGTON — This is how Northwest Indiana’s congressional delegation — U.S. Reps. Jackie Walorski, Republican, and Peter J. Visclosky, Democrat, and U.S. Sens. Joe Donnelly, Democrat, and Dan Coats, Republican — voted on key legislation.

House

SERVICES FOR VETERANS: The House concurred in the Senate amendments to the Department of Veterans Affairs Expiring Authorities Act (H.R. 1412), sponsored by Rep. Mike Coffman, R-Colo. The amendments would provide several million dollars of funding for sports activities by disabled veterans, extend for one year the Department of Veterans Affairs’ authority to provide childcare assistance to veterans receiving intensive health care services, and extend the VA’s authority to recover from third parties the cost of care and services that are furnished to veterans with health plan contracts for conditions not related to military service. Coffman said the sports program “ensures that disabled veterans in local communities throughout the country continue to have opportunities for rehabilitation, stress relief, and higher achievement through adaptive sports.” The vote, on Sept. 27, was unanimous with 402 yeas.

Votes: Walorski, yea; Visclosky, did not vote

HOUSE RULES AND A GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN: The House passed a resolution (H.Res. 361), sponsored by Rep. Pete Sessions, R-Texas, to waive a House procedural rule in order to allow the House to quickly consider legislation to avert a government shutdown and to increase the debt ceiling. Sessions said “a government shutdown is detrimental to this Nation and to the American people,” and the resolution “is necessary to ensure that once a decision is reached, this body can quickly react without undue delay to prevent a government shutdown.” An opponent, Rep. James P. McGovern, D-Mass., said “the American people deserve a fair and transparent legislative process so that we can keep our government open and our economy on track,” whereas the resolution would block transparency. The vote, on Sept. 28, was 226 yeas to 191 nays.

Votes: Walorski, yea; Visclosky, did not vote

MEDICAL DEVICES TAX: The House passed an amendment sponsored by Rep. Erik Paulsen, R-Minn., to the continuing appropriations resolution (H.J. Res. 59). The amendment would eliminate the 2.3 percent sales tax on medical devices used to help fund the health care reform law, or Obamacare. Paulsen said the tax “has destroyed jobs, it’s destroyed innovation, and it has hurt patient care” by increasing costs for the innovative U.S. health technology industry and leading industry members to move to other countries. An opponent, Rep. Chaka Fattah, D-Pa., said the amendment was part of an effort by Republicans to reverse settled policy on health care and obstruct the benefits of health care reform. The vote, on Sept. 28, was 248 yeas to 174 nays.

Votes: Walorski, yea; Visclosky, did not vote

DELAYING OBAMACARE: The House passed an amendment sponsored by Rep. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., to the continuing appropriations resolution (H.J. Res. 59). The amendment would delay by one year the implementation of the health care reform law, also known as Obamacare. Blackburn said the delay would allow time needed to repair problems with health care reform, including the higher cost of health insurance. An opponent, Rep. Rosa L. DeLauro, D-Conn., said the amendment “drastically underfunds the fundamental priorities of the American people, and it tries yet again to delay families’ access to affordable health care.” The vote, on Sept. 28, was 231 yeas to 192 nays.

Votes: Walorski, yea; Visclosky, did not vote

MILITARY PAY AND GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN: The House passed the Pay Our Military Act (H.R. 3210), sponsored by Rep. Mike Coffman, R-Colo. The bill would ensure that members of the military continue to receive their paychecks from the government should the government shut down during fiscal year 2014. Coffman said failing to guarantee that military members are paid would create the threat of financial hardships for their families due to a government shutdown, and “we must ensure that the men and women who defend our Nation in the armed services, and their families, will continue to be paid.” The vote, on Sept. 28, was unanimous with 423 yeas.

Votes: Walorski, yea; Visclosky, did not vote

FUNDING STATE DEPARTMENT: The House passed the Department of State Operations and Embassy Security Authorization Act (H.R. 2848), sponsored by Rep. Edward R. Royce, R-Calif. The bill would authorize funding for the State Department in fiscal year 2014, including $4.83 billion to maintain and enhance security at U.S. embassies. Royce said the bill included measures to increase cost efficiencies and reform security practices at the State Department, ensuring “that our embassies and personnel stationed abroad are protected at a time of their greatest need.” The vote, on Sept. 28, was 384 yeas to 37 nays.

Votes: Walorski, yea; Visclosky, did not vote

CONGRESSIONAL AWARDS: The House passed the Congressional Award Program Reauthorization Act (S. 1348), sponsored by Sen. Thomas R. Carper, D-Del., to extend the Congressional Award program, which issues achievement awards to Americans of 14 to 23 years of age, until 2018. A supporter, Rep. Virginia Foxx, R-N.C., said: “It is of great importance to provide support and encouragement to America’s young people, particularly when they’re learning the value of giving back to their communities and becoming productive, upstanding citizens.” The vote, on Sept. 30, was 387 yeas to 35 nays.

Votes: Walorski, yea; Visclosky, yea

MOTION TO AVERT GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN: The House agreed to a motion sponsored by Rep. Harold Rogers, R-Ky., for the House to recede from its amendments to the continuing appropriations resolution (H.J. Res. 59), and instead concur in an amendment to delay for one year the individual mandate in the health care reform law, eliminate a health insurance subsidy for members of Congress and their staffs, and fund the government through December 15. Rogers said the motion “will allow this Congress to continue to make progress on our important legislative work, including finding meaningful, responsible, bipartisan solutions to our fiscal problems, like the debt ceiling, sequestration, and the most immediate issue at hand, funding the government for the 2014 fiscal year.” An opponent, Rep. Nita M. Lowey, D-N.Y., said the motion was “designed to shut down government unless we delay, defund, and deny affordable health care to American families.” The vote, on Sept. 30, was 228 yeas to 201 nays.

Votes: Walorski, yea; Visclosky, nay

HOUSE-SENATE CONTINUING APPROPRIATIONS CONFERENCE: The House passed a resolution (H.Res. 368), sponsored by Rep. Pete Sessions, R-Texas, to request a conference with the Senate to negotiate differences between the versions of the continuing appropriations resolution (H.J. Res. 59) passed by the House and Senate. Sessions said the resolution would allow the House and Senate “to go to conference so that we can fund the government and get it done right” rather than go through a government shutdown. An opponent, Rep. Louise Slaughter, D-N.Y., said the resolution was a one-sided attempt by Republicans to push their version of a continuing appropriations bill through Congress without any input from House Democrats. The vote, on Sept. 30, was 228 yeas to 199 nays.

Votes: Walorski, yea; Visclosky, nay

GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN AND TOURIST ATTRACTIONS: The House passed the National Park Service Operations, Smithsonian Institution, National Gallery of Art, and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum Continuing Appropriations Resolution (H.J. Res. 70), sponsored by Rep. Michael K. Simpson, R-Idaho. The bill would provide funding in fiscal 2014 for operations of the National Park Service, the Smithsonian Institution, the National Gallery of Art, and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, despite the government shutdown that began this week. Simpson said that by keeping open tourist attractions operated by the government, the bill would preserve the availability to the public of the national parks, as well as facilities that generate up to $200 million a day of economic activity for the Washington, D.C., area. An opponent, Rep. James P. Moran, D-Va., said the bill would keep open only a small number of agencies affected by the government shutdown, unfairly keeping all other affected agencies closed and failing to resolve the shutdown. The vote, on Oct. 2, was 252 yeas to 173 nays.

Votes: Walorski, yea; Visclosky, nay

FUNDING THE NIH: The House passed the National Institutes of Health Continuing Appropriations Resolution (H.J. Res. 73), sponsored by Rep. Jack Kingston, R-Ga. The bill would provide funding for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in fiscal 2014. Kingston said passing the bill would show bipartisan willingness to work toward ending the government shutdown by changing the confrontational tone of the shutdown debate between Democrats and Republicans. An opponent, Rep. Rosa L. DeLauro, D-Conn., called the bill “a desperate attempt by irresponsible lawmakers to play political games with a crisis they have created” by shutting down the government to stop Obamacare from taking effect, and the responsible action would be to end the entire shutdown rather than fund specific agencies. The vote, on Oct. 2, was 254 yeas to 171 nays.

Votes: Walorski, yea; Visclosky, nay

FUNDING VETERANS BENEFITS: The House passed the Veterans Benefits Continuing Appropriations Resolution (H.J. Res. 72), sponsored by Rep. John Abney Culberson, R-Texas. The bill would provide $2.46 billion to fund the Veterans Affairs Department’s payments of benefits to veterans in fiscal 2014 despite the government shutdown. Culberson said the funding “is essential because the VA has told us that funds for these benefits will run out by the end of this month,” leaving disabled, low-income, and other veterans without vital benefits. An opponent, Rep. Sanford D. Bishop Jr., D-Ga., said the bill failed to fund discretionary accounts at the VA that were of equal importance to veterans, and Bishop called on Congress to instead pass a bill funding the entire government. The vote, on Oct. 3, was 259 yeas to 157 nays.

Votes: Walorski, yea; Visclosky, nay

Senate

CONTINUING APPROPRIATIONS AND OBAMACARE: The Senate passed its amended version of a continuing appropriations resolution (H.J. Res. 59), sponsored by Rep. Harold Rogers, R-Ky. The amended resolution would fund government programs through November 15, 2013, at the level provided in fiscal 2013, while maintaining funding for implementation of the 2010 health care reform law, also known as Obamacare, and raising the debt limit. A supporter, Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, said the amended resolution would avert the prospect of a small group of partisan House Republicans thwarting health care reform by defunding Obamacare, and avoid a costly government shutdown. An opponent of the amended resolution, Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, said “we ought to go ahead and defund ObamaCare today in light of experience between 2010 and 2013 which shows it has not lived up to expectations and promises.” The vote, on Sept. 27, was 54 yeas to 44 nays.

Votes: Donnelly, yea; Coats, nay

HOUSE CONTINUING APPROPRIATIONS PROPOSAL: The Senate tabled the House amendments to the continuing appropriations resolution (H.J. Res. 59). The amendments would have delayed for one year the individual mandate in the health care reform law, also known as Obamacare, eliminated a health insurance subsidy for members of Congress and their staffs, and funded the government through December 15. An opponent of the amendments, Sen. Barbara Mikulski, D-Md., said they would “eliminate the benefits affecting prevention and particularly women’s health” included in Obamacare. The vote to table the amendments, on Sept. 30, was 54 yeas to 46 nays.

Votes: Donnelly, yea; Coats, nay

REJECTING HOUSE-SENATE CONTINUING APPROPRIATIONS CONFERENCE: The Senate tabled a resolution (H.Res. 368), sponsored by Rep. Pete Sessions, R-Texas, under which the House requested a conference with the Senate to negotiate differences between the versions of the continuing appropriations resolution (H.J. Res. 59) passed by the House and Senate. A supporter of the House resolution, Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., said that if the health care reform funding included in the Senate version went forward, the U.S. debt would increase by $6.2 trillion over the next 75 years while adding to the problem of “a lack of jobs and a lack of economic growth” in the U.S. An opponent of the House resolution, Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La., said it was an attempt by Republicans to hold hostage the federal government and state and local governments in an ill-advised effort to block the health care reform law. The vote to table the resolution, on Sept. 30, was 54 yeas to 46 nays.

Votes: Donnelly, yea; Coats, nay

HOUSE-SENATE BUDGET NEGOTIATIONS: The Senate tabled a message from the House accompanying a continuing appropriations resolution (H.J. Res. 59) that would have established a House-Senate conference committee to negotiate an agreement on the resolution. A supporter of the message, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, said Senate Democrats were unwilling to accept changes to the health care reform law, which McConnell said “is killing jobs, driving up premiums, and driving people out of the health care plans they already have and like.” An opponent of the message, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, said Senate Democrats have been willing to negotiate with Republicans on the budget, but Republicans have created the government shutdown with their unreasonable opposition to health care reform. The vote to table the message, on Oct. 1, was 54 yeas to 46 nays.

Votes: Donnelly, yea; Coats, nay