WASHINGTON — This is how Northwest Indiana’s congressional delegation — U.S. Reps. Jackie Walorski, Republican, and Peter J. Visclosky, Democrat, and U.S. Sens. Joe Donnelly, Democrat, and Dan Coats, Republican — voted on key legislation.

House

LOANS OF FOREIGN ARTWORK: The House passed the Foreign Cultural Exchange Jurisdictional Immunity Clarification Act (H.R. 4292), sponsored by Rep. Steve Chabot, R-Ohio. The bill would immune from seizure artworks that have been loaned by foreign countries to various institutions for temporary display in museums and other public venues, with the exception of claims based on art connected to Germany’s Nazi government. Chabot said that with the immunity, “we will have more opportunities to see art from Europe and from around the world. It is important to have exchanges of culture, so that people around the world understand the other cultures and so that it maybe makes the planet a little more safe.” The vote, on May 6, was 388 yeas to 4 nays.

Votes: Visclosky, yea; Walorski, yea

CREDIT UNIONS AND MORTGAGE LENDING: The House passed the Capital Access for Small Community Financial Institutions Act (H.R. 3584), sponsored by Rep. Steve Stivers, R-Ohio, that would allow nonfederally insured credit unions to apply for membership with the federal government’s 12 Federal Home Loan Banks, which supply credit to banks to support their mortgage lending. Stivers said the change would allow those credit unions that are privately insured to have the same access to the Federal Home Loan Bank system that other banks and credit unions have, establishing a level playing field. The vote, on May 6, was unanimous with 395 yeas.

Votes: Visclosky, yea; Walorski, yea

WOMEN’S HISTORY MUSEUM: The House passed a bill (H.R. 863), sponsored by Rep. Carolyn B. Maloney, D-N.Y., that would establish an eight-member Commission to Study the Potential Creation of a National Women’s History Museum in Washington, D.C. Maloney said the bill sought to rectify a situation in which “women’s contributions to our country are largely missing from our national museums, memorials, statues, and textbooks.” An opponent, Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-Minn., said there were already 20 women’s museums in the country, making another museum unnecessary. Bachmann added: “This museum that would be built on The National Mall, on Federal land, will enshrine the radical feminist movement that stands against the pro-life movement, the pro-family movement, and the pro-traditional marriage movement.” The vote, on May 7, was 383 yeas to 33 nays.

Votes: Visclosky, yea; Walorski, yea

HOLDING IRS OFFICIAL IN CONTEMPT OF CONGRESS: The House passed a resolution (H. Res. 574), sponsored by Rep. Darrell E. Issa, R-Calif. The resolution recommended that the House find Lois G. Lerner, the former Director of Exempt Organizations at the Internal Revenue Service, in contempt of Congress for refusing to comply with a House Oversight and Government Reform Committee subpoena into an IRS tax probe of conservative nonprofit groups. Issa said that in making a voluntary prepared statement to the committee at a hearing on May 22, 2013, and then refusing to answer questions from committee members, Lerner improperly used the Fifth Amendment not to exercise her right not to incriminate herself but to stop committee members from requiring her to defend her statement. A resolution opponent, Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, D-Md., said the resolution sought to violate Lerner’s Fifth Amendment rights by pursuing a contempt vote when more than 30 independent experts believed a contempt finding would not pass judicial review. The vote, on May 7, was 231 yeas to 187 nays.

Votes: Visclosky, nay; Walorski, yea

THE IRS AND CONSERVATIVE NONPROFIT GROUPS: The House passed a resolution (H. Res. 565), sponsored by Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, to request that Attorney General Eric Holder appoint a special counsel to investigate the targeting of conservative nonprofit groups by the Internal Revenue Service. Jordan said the IRS targeting punished the groups for exercising their right to speak out against the government, and an independent investigation by special counsel was necessary to ensure that politics do not prejudge the outcome of the investigation of the IRS. A resolution opponent, Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, D-Texas, said there was no proven conflict of interest in the investigation being carried out by the Justice Department and led by Barbara Bosserman, making a special counsel unnecessary. The vote, on May 7, was 250 yeas to 168 nays.

Votes: Visclosky, nay; Walorski, yea

ELECTRICITY IN AFRICA: The House passed the Electrify Africa Act (H.R. 2548), sponsored by Rep. Edward R. Royce, R-Calif. The bill would direct the president to create a long-term strategy to assist sub-Saharan Africa in the development of electricity generation, and direct the U.S. Agency for International Development and the Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC) to prioritize loan guarantees and investments in African nations and financial institutions to promote investment in the continent’s power grid. Royce said the lack of affordable, reliable electricity has stifled Africa’s economy, and by establishing a clear and comprehensive government policy supporting the growth of electricity in Africa, the bill would give the private sector “the certainty that it needs to invest in African electricity at no cost to the U.S. taxpayer.” A bill opponent, Rep. Tom McClintock, R-Calif., said its three-year renewal of OPIC would continue a situation in which the government agency “pays for the bad business decisions of large corporations” by guaranteeing loans to the companies for their overseas investments. The vote, on May 8, was 297 yeas to 117 nays.

Votes: Visclosky, yea; Walorski, nay

SELECT COMMITTEE ON BENGHAZI ATTACK: The House passed a resolution (H. Res. 567), sponsored by Rep. Pete Sessions, R-Texas, to establish a select committee to investigate the 2012 terrorist attack on the U.S. embassy in Benghazi, Libya, in which the U.S. ambassador to Libya and three other embassy staffers were killed. Sessions said the select committee was necessary because the Obama administration has not fully complied with subpoenas regarding the attack, has not provided documents and information to investigators, and has retroactively classified previously unclassified files on the attack. An opponent of forming a select committee, Rep. Louise McIntosh Slaughter, D-N.Y., said it was part of an effort by Republicans to use the Benghazi attack “for political and financial gain.” Slaughter also said the select committee would be structured in a way that minimizes Democratic involvement in the investigation and therefore weakens its effectiveness. The vote, on May 8, was 232 yeas to 186 nays.

Votes: Visclosky, nay; Walorski, yea

SENATE

APPEALS COURT JUDGE: The Senate confirmed the nomination of Nancy L. Moritz to serve as a judge on the U.S. Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals. A supporter, Sen. Patrick J. Leahy, D-Vt., cited Moritz’s close to four years of experience as a judge on the Kansas Supreme Court and several decades of previous experience as a Kansas appeals court judge, assistant U.S. attorney, and private practice lawyer. Leahy said “her breadth and depth of experience as both a practitioner and a jurist will make her well suited to serve on the Tenth Circuit.” The vote, on May 5, was 90 yeas to 3 nays.

Votes: Coats, yea; Donnelly, yea

ENERGY EFFICIENCY BILL: The Senate approved a cloture motion to end debate on the Energy Savings and Industrial Competitiveness Act (S. 2262), sponsored by Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, R-N.H. The bill would establish stricter national model energy efficiency standards for residential and commercial buildings, direct the Energy Department to work with industry on the development of efficiency technologies, and establish an initiative for financing efficiency upgrades at commercial buildings. Shaheen said the bill would help both government and the private sector capitalize on “substantial opportunities which exist across all sectors of our economy that would allow us to conserve energy, to create good-paying private sector jobs, and to reduce pollution.” An opponent of ending debate, Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, said Republicans were being blocked from the opportunity to offer amendments addressing issues such as energy production, and senators should have “a fulsome debate on American energy policy,” including the amendments, before voting on the bill. The vote, on May 6, was 79 yeas to 20 nays.

Votes: Coats, yea; Donnelly, yea

MASSACHUSETTS DISTRICT JUDGE: The Senate confirmed the nomination of Indira Talwani to serve as a U.S. District Judge for the District of Massachusetts. A supporter, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., cited Talwani’s two decades of experience as a private practice lawyer representing clients in the Massachusetts courts, Federal Courts of Appeals, and Supreme Court. Warren called Talwani “a first-rate litigator with impressive credentials. Her unique professional and personal background will bring important perspective to the federal bench in Massachusetts.” The vote, on May 8, was unanimous with 94 yeas.

Votes: Coats, yea; Donnelly, yea

ILLINOIS DISTRICT JUDGE: The Senate confirmed the nomination of Nancy J. Rosenstengel to serve as a U.S. District Judge for the Southern District of Illinois. A supporter, Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., cited Rosenstengel’s 11 years of experience as a judicial law clerk to Judge G. Patrick Murphy, whose position she would fill, and five years of experience as Clerk of Court for the Southern District. Durbin said Rosenstengel “has the experience, integrity and judgment to be an outstanding member of the federal bench.” The vote, on May 8, was unanimous with 95 yeas.

Votes: Coats, yea; Donnelly, yea