posttrib
SPARKLE 
Weather Updates

How they voted

Updated: October 11, 2013 3:44PM



WASHINGTON — This is how Northwest Indiana’s delegation in the U.S. House of Representatives — U.S. Reps. Jackie Walorski, Republican, and Peter J. Visclosky, Democrat ­— voted on key legislation this week. There were no key votes in the Senate

HOUSE

CARBON TAX: The House passed an amendment sponsored by Rep. Steve Scalise, R-La., to the Regulations From the Executive in Need of Scrutiny Act (H.R. 367). The amendment would require the executive branch of government to receive approval from Congress before it could implement a tax on carbon dioxide emissions. Smith said that if the president adopted such a tax, “manufacturing output in energy-intensive sectors, for example, could drop by as much as 15 percent,” and the amendment was needed to prevent a carbon tax from hurting the economy. An opponent, Rep. Steve Cohen, D-Tenn., said the amendment “puts the interests of special industry--the gas and oil industry, particularly--above the American public’s health, clean air, and the environment.” The vote, on Aug. 2, was 237 yeas to 176 nays.

Votes: Visclosky, nay; Walorski, yea

HEALTH CARE REFORM RULES: The House passed an amendment sponsored by Rep. Jason T. Smith, R-Mo., to the Regulations From the Executive in Need of Scrutiny Act (H.R. 367). The amendment would require congressional approval of all government rules issued under the authority of the Affordable Care Act. Smith said “Congress must assert its role in oversight and give the American people their voice back in government, away from the bureaucrats,” and “prevent this widely unsupported law from causing further damage to our health care system.” An opponent, Rep. Steve Cohen, D-Tenn., said the amendment would obstruct the health care reform law’s measures to reduce the cost of health care and improve care. The vote, on Aug. 2, was 227 yeas to 185 nays.

Votes: Visclosky, nay; Walorski, yea

DUPLICATING FEDERAL REGULATIONS: The House passed an amendment sponsored by Rep. Tom Latham, R-Iowa, to the Regulations From the Executive in Need of Scrutiny Act (H.R. 367). The amendment would require government agencies to include lists of regulatory actions related to the rules they are developing in the reports on the rules that the agencies submit to Congress. Latham said the requirement “will help clarify areas of overlap and highlight opportunities for reducing the compliance burden faced by American employers” by reducing the possibility of agencies issuing redundant rules. An opponent, Rep. Hank Johnson Jr., D-Ga., said the amendment “would add yet another onerous and unnecessary burden on agencies and will further stifle agency rulemaking.” The vote, on Aug. 2, was 263 yeas to 152 nays.

Votes: Visclosky, nay; Walorski, yea

REGULATING NUCLEAR POWER: The House rejected an amendment sponsored by Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., to the Regulations From the Executive in Need of Scrutiny Act (H.R. 367). The amendment would have exempted Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations involving the safety of nuclear power plants from the bill’s requirement for Congress to approve new regulations from the executive branch. Nadler said: “The NRC must have the ability and flexibility to issue new regulations to safeguard the health and well-being of all Americans and to prevent nuclear disasters.” An opponent, Rep. Bob Goodlatte, R-Va., said Congress should “guarantee that regulatory decisions that pertain to nuclear reactor safety are the best decisions that can be made,” and therefore the NRC should not be exempted. The vote, on Aug. 2, was 186 yeas to 229 nays.

Votes: Visclosky, yea; Walorski, nay

CONGRESSIONAL REVIEW OF REGULATIONS: The House passed the Regulations From the Executive in Need of Scrutiny Act (H.R. 367), sponsored by Rep. Todd C. Young, R-Ind. The bill would require the executive branch to receive a joint resolution of approval from Congress before enacting any regulation estimated to cost more than $100 million. Young said the requirement would “balance broad economic interests against the narrow jurisdiction of individual federal agencies” by improving the ability of elected legislators and the citizens they represent to review regulations. An opponent, Rep. Steve Cohen, D-Tenn., said the bill “threatens to undermine vital protections that ensure the safety and soundness of the entire range of societal needs, from food safety to clean air and clean water, to workplace safety, to consumer product safety, to financial stability.” The vote, on Aug. 2, was 232 yeas to 183 nays.

Votes: Visclosky, nay; Walorski, yea

HEALTH CARE REFORM: The House passed the Keep the IRS Off Your Health Care Act (H.R. 2009), sponsored by Rep. Tom Price, R-Ga. The bill would bar the Treasury Secretary and Internal Revenue Service from enforcing the 2010 health care reform laws. Price said the laws, known as ObamaCare, gave the IRS 47 new powers over health care, and instead the authority of the IRS to “ harass and abuse Americans” should be curtailed by revoking those powers. An opponent, Rep. Sander M. Levin, D-Mich., said the bill’s supporters relied on “all kinds of misstatements about the powers and the role of the IRS” to argue for revoking the powers, but in fact the health care reforms laws give the IRS no access to medical records or other personal history of Americans. The vote, on Aug. 2, was 232 yeas to 185 nays.

Votes: Visclosky, nay; Walorski, yea



© 2014 Sun-Times Media, LLC. All rights reserved. This material may not be copied or distributed without permission. For more information about reprints and permissions, visit www.suntimesreprints.com. To order a reprint of this article, click here.