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3 new South Shore Legends

John Edward 'Jack' Chevigny speaks about his uncle John Edward 'Jack' Chevigny who was inducted inSouth Shore Legends during an

John Edward "Jack" Chevigny speaks about his uncle John Edward "Jack" Chevigny who was inducted into the South Shore Legends during an induction ceremony at the Indiana Welcome Center in Hammond, Ind. | Charles Mitchell~For Sun-Times Media

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For more information, visit online at www.legacyfoundationlakeco.org/southshorelegends.

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Updated: January 24, 2013 6:24AM



Many Northwest Indiana residents have gone on to reach high acclaim and accolades in the world of business, entertainment, education, sports and community service.

To honor these South Shore Legends, an annual induction ceremony announces a new “class” to be profiled on the Wall of Fame at the South Shore Convention and Visitors Authority’s Indiana Welcome Center in Hammond.

“This is our eighth year. This is all volunteer work — of the people, by the people and for the people,” said John Davies, coordinator of the evening’s event and also managing director of Society of Innovators of Northwest Indiana, as he greeted the crowd. “We will continue a great tradition of discovering and celebrating people from Northwest Indiana who have changed the world and are called legends.”

BP of Whiting is the sponsor for the South Shore Legends program.

The three individuals honored this year are former Munster resident Sue Hendrickson; accomplished actor and Gary native Avery Brooks; and John Edward “Jack” Chevigny, who grew up in Hammond and became a sports icon.

Hendrickson uncovered the skeleton of the largest T-Rex ever discovered. The prehistoric dinosaur, 65-million-year-old “Sue,” found in the Badlands of South Dakota, currently resides in Chicago’s Field Museum.

Brooks has appeared in many acting roles, but is best known for his work as Benjamin Sisko in the television series “Star Trek: Deep Space Nine.” One of his life’s missions is to be a role model for children, especially boys, teaching them that anything is possible in their lives.

Neither Hendrickson nor Brooks were able to attend the ceremony.

Chevigny began his sports career as a football player for Hammond High School, then played at the University of Notre Dame and served in the Marine Corps. His coaching for the Marines was legendary, as he led the team to great success while at the helm.

While playing at Notre Dame, the comment “That’s one for the Gipper” was attributed to him as he vaulted across the goal line against Navy in one of football’s great games.

Chevigny died while serving as a Marine on Iwo Jima.

Also on the program was the presentation of the Legends Scholar and Traveling Trophy awards.

The scholarship recipient was Gary resident Cosetta Irma Black. She is a first-generation college graduate in a family of 14 siblings and is working on her master’s degree in elementary education.

Her school, Calumet College of St. Joseph, will house the traveling trophy until next year’s scholarship recipient is announced.

Associated with the South Shore Legends inductees, past and present, is a unique book serving as a teaching tool for Northwest Indiana students and educators.

“The Legends Compass: A Collection of True Tales for Young Adventurers and Dreamers” is an activity resource sponsored by the Legacy Foundation. It offers the opportunity for inspiration and motivation for youngsters as they learn about these South Shore Legends who grew up in their communities and achieved great success.

The activity book was written by a certified teacher and meets Indiana Academic Standards for the fourth-grade curriculum in reading and social studies.

The resource was made available through community partnerships, and is accessible to schools throughout Northwest Indiana.



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