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Shelter gets help

Sue Lynch Portage writes bid for one items up for auctiduring fundraiser for Gabiel's Horn shelter WoodlPark Portage Ind. Jan.

Sue Lynch of Portage writes in a bid for one of the items up for auction during a fundraiser for Gabiel's Horn shelter at Woodland Park in Portage, Ind., on Jan. 12, 2013. | Charles Mitchell~For Sun-Times Media

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AT A GLANCE

For more information about Gabriel’s Horn, call 364-8018 or go to www.gabrielshelter.org. The shelter is at 792 McCool Road, South Haven.

Updated: February 23, 2013 6:09AM



About 100 people attended a recent fundraiser for Gabriel’s Horn that included dancing and gift baskets up for silent auction, plus live entertainment.

The event, at Oakwood Hall in Portage’s Woodland Park, raised about $2,000, said Mignon Kennedy, the shelter’s executive director.

The dance, in its eighth year, is one of several fundraisers for the shelter for homeless women and their children, said Tim Sullivan, president of the not-for-profit’s board. Sullivan said the shelter has had to work harder at fundraising of late, adding neither the dance nor a walk in Michigan City brought in what was expected.

The agency’s budget for 2012 was about $50,000; the board is still working on the budget for this year, Sullivan said.

The shelter, which opened in 2004, has five rooms, Kennedy said, and can house a total of five women and eight children. The shelter serves all of Porter County, with an average stay of three to four months, though residents can stay at Gabriel’s Horn for up to six months.

“We do often have a waiting list,” Kennedy said.

The dance, like the other fundraisers and grant money, helps cover the shelter’s expenses. House manager Vickie Dennison, who’s been going to the dance for the past few years, said though she doesn’t dance, she enjoys watching others do so, including the children who attend the family-friendly event.

The dance’s casual atmosphere also is part of its appeal.

“It’s not real fancy; you can just go as you are,” Dennison said. “Some people like to dress up and some people don’t. You can go and you’re comfortable.”



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