posttrib
MEDIOCRE 
Weather Updates

Letters to the Editor

SEND US YOUR OPINION: Letters to the editor should be no more than 300 words. The Post-Tribune reserves the right to edit or reject any letter. All letters must be signed and include your name, address and telephone number for verification. To send us your letter to the editor, mail to: 350 N. Orleans St., Chicago, IL 60654; or e-mail to ptvoice@post-trib.com. If you have questions, call John O’Neill, editor, at (312) 321-2028.

Updated: April 8, 2014 6:21AM



Too much in common with Common Core

This year started with great optimism for thousands of concerned parents, grandparents and many educators from around the state. The governor spoke of his support for “Uncommonly high standards written by Hoosiers for Hoosiers.” The General Assembly was and is moving toward dropping the highly controversial and swiftly adopted Common Core Standards in 2010. The State Board of Education and Department of Education announced they would work cooperatively together to produce a new set of standards.

Now, in early March and after three days of public testimony on the new draft standards, the ONLY area of agreement between the advocates of the 2010 Common Core Standards and the opponents of Common Core is that the draft standards are remarkably similar to Common Core! This cut-and-paste result is a huge betrayal to the hundreds of citizens and the many legislators that have worked for years to not only retain our states educational sovereignty but to produce educational standards that are “uncommonly” high and truly prepare children for their careers or college.

The State Board of Education is the first board in the country that adopted Common Core in 2010 to still have a chance to develop a better set of standards but time is running out. The education industry has historically fallen prey to jumping on the bandwagon of unproven, untested ideas such as Common Core. None of us would expose our children to medications that haven’t gone through years of trials and FDA approvals. Why are we willing to continue to use our children as “educational lab rats” when it comes to ideas such as Common Core and now potentially the draft standards?

David Read

Carmel



© 2014 Sun-Times Media, LLC. All rights reserved. This material may not be copied or distributed without permission. For more information about reprints and permissions, visit www.suntimesreprints.com. To order a reprint of this article, click here.